Car Review: 2017 Haval H6 Lux.

This is the second visit to A Wheel Thing for Chinese brand Haval. This time round, the second level H6 Lux graces the driveway, complete with poky turbo four and six speed dual clutch auto, for two weeks. Let’s see how it fared.Style wise there’s nods towards the English and Germans, with a Range Rover Evoke-esque profile, complete with slanting window line, whilst front and rear there’s Audi in the grille and tail lights, even down to the crease line from the outer edges. The lights themselves are self levelling and there’s the almost obligatory LED driving lights in the cluster. It stands at 1700 mm tall including roof rails, 4549 mm in length and rolls on a 2720 mm wheelbase. Rubber is from Cooper, 225/55, on good looking 19 inch alloys.It’s here the first issue arises. The tyres are of a hard compound and work fantastically well on gravel and unsettled or broken road surfaces. But take the H6 onto wet roads, nay, even damp roads, and grip limits diminish rapidly. The front driven wheels will spin far too easily, with traction control seemingly powerless to intervene straight away. It’s worth pointing out that this happens on light throttle, not a heavy application. They’ll also spin on a dry road if at an angle, not with the steering wheel straight ahead.The dual clutch auto is from fabled German transmission maker Getrag, and when it’s under way it’s a pearler. Note the caveat: when it’s under way…from standstill it exhibits all of the worst traits of a DCT, being a far too l gap between engagement of first, the pressing of the accelerator, and forward motion happening. This particular transmission was also not a fan of cold weather, with stuttering and indecision the primary behaviour shown from start up. It also requires a fine balance between brake and go pedal on slight slopes such as those in residential roads and doing a three point turn. So combined with the overly hard rubber, lack of traction, the stutter then grip, the initial driving part is all a bit of an eyebrow raiser.When it all works it’s crisp, super quick, and silky silky smooth. There’s even a little “phut” from the twin exhaust tips well hidden in the lower bumper. Naturally there’s a manual shift option, and that’s just as efficient whether using the transmission selector or the twin metal paddles behind the tiller. Give it some welly and it’ll slide on through as easily as a goal-sneak in a world cup level football game.It’s a pretty decent ride too, with the rear perhaps just a little too softly sprung. On the rutted and unsettled road around Sydney Motorsport Park it’s fantastic, with minimal compression and there’s a genuine feeling of stability and agility. Take the Haval H6 out onto the freeways and it’s flat as a tack. It changes lane easily and smoothly, with no indication of mass transfer. The steering? Well…it feels like a long block of rubber, with nothing on centre and as you go further left or right it tightens but still has no feeling of anything bar…rubber.Oddly, it’ll also cock a rear at slow speed when winding on lock and coming off a kerb. There’s no sense of instability but it’s a weird sensation given the otherwise competency of the chassis. Punt it up (or down) Sydney’s Old Bathurst Road on the fringes of the Blue Mountains and it’ll both slur through the gears and ride clean and stable from top to bottom or vice versa. Ask the question for an overtake on a flat road and it’ll whistle up the required head of steam in no time.While you’re doing that you can enjoy the rather excellent interior. Yes, there’s a smattering of grey plastic with a woodgrain look but aside from that it’s well laid out, easy to read and use, comfortable to sit in with quick heating (front AND rear) leathers eats plus there’s a surprising amount of leg room for rear seat passengers and an indecent amount of rear cargo room. If there’s a let down, and it’s nit picky at that, it’s the look of the background for the driver’s info and centre screens.

Think a crosshatched pattern in a slightly lighter blue than the rest of the screen and you’re looking at what a coloured screen from the 1980s. Having said that, the driver’s screen will show economy (and it’s far too thirsty at consistently over eleven litres of 95 RON per one hundred kilometres), tyre pressures, and more.There’s a full glass roof with sunroof at the front and backed by a coloured coded cloth roller, LED interior lighting that varies through seven or eight different colours, truly tasteful texture to the black plastic and a pleasing contrast with white lining the lower section, plus cobalt blue backlighting to the alloy sill plates. The centre console has the tab for the colour changing, drives modes (Sports/Eco/Normal), descent control, mirror folding, park assist, and even audio. What would have been nice in the Haval H6 would be the slide out extensions in the sunshades. Far too often the sun was coming through the gap left by the shortness of the shades. Another quirk and not one that’s of real concern, is the temperature controls. Just about every other digital readout in cars offer 0.5 degree increments. The Haval is degree by degree. Like I said, nothing major but notable for the fact it stands out in the way it does. The selector is tastefully trimmed in alloy and leather and Haval have even gone back in time with a coin slot. It’s a push button Start/Stop and here’s another quirk. The Haval H6 test car required that, after you’d selected Park, that not one but two presses of the button were required in order to power off, in conjunction with ensuring the foot was OFF the brake. Leave the foot on and….the car would start back up.The wide opening doors make ingress and egress simple and show off just how much rear leg room there is even with the front pews pushed back. The sills look good in daylight and simply stunning at night. Safety wise there’s six airbags, ESP from Bosch, pretensioning seat belts and confident feeling brakes with the usual assistance electronically plus Euro flashing emergency style brake lights. Overall, Haval have really done a fantastic job in packing and trimming the H6.

At The End Of The Drive.
Haval H6. Not a particularly inspiring name but logical in the sense of how Haval will position their vehicles. Somewhat derivative styling, quirky transmission, and rubber bar steering aside, it’s a delightfully packaged vehicle, well equipped, a good drive and ride on dry and gravelly roads, and at just on $30K (plus free satnav as of Jun 2017) a very well priced item to consider. When Haval tighten up the DCT and make the feeling of steering more accessible it will be a hard package to ignore. Here’s the link to have a look for yourself: Haval Australia H6

Car Review: 2017 Kia Rio Si.

Kia’s rollout of updated and revamped cars continues, with the Rio the latest of the family to receive a makeover. A Wheel Thing goes one on one with the $22000 (includes metallic paint)2017 Kia Rio Si.Straight up, gone are the goldfish goggle eyed headlights, trimmed down to slim line units from front on and sweeping back into the fenders. The grille is reduced to a mail slot and sits above a larger and restyled air intake bisecting two smaller slots fitted with driving lights that come on when cornering. In profile the window line echoes that of the Sorento as do the tail lights and overall the Rio seems to have a more upright stance than the outgoing model.That sleek new body hides a mix of modern and dinosaur style technology. There’s a peppy and zippy 1.4L multipoint fuel injected four, good for a maximum power output of 74 kilowatts and torque of 133 Nm. That figure is reached at 4000 rpm and it’s noticeable that pull from this engine, by the seat of the paints, comes in from around 2500. The dinosaur in the room is the archaic four speed automatic transmission. This, wholly and solely, holds back any decent driveability. Under light acceleration the shift from first to second feels as if the car has hit a puddle of molasses. When pushed the drop becomes even more visible, going from 5000 rpm down to just over 2000.

Although it shifts smoothly and slickly enough, the Rio would be better equipped with a CVT. Using the manual shift option barely improves the experience. It also affects fuel economy adversely, with the official figures being quoted as 6.2L/100 km from the 45 litre tank for the combined cycle. A Wheel Thing saw a best of 7.2L/100 and that was on a freeway at constant speed after a week of urban driving.Inside it’s a complete freshen up. A real boon for people that like variety is the addition of Digital Audio Broadcast or DAB radio. Yes, digital radio in a $22K car, plus Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. It’s a simple and clean look to the seven inch screen, which also offers in the Si and SLi satellite navigation with traffic information, with the typically ergonomic and easy to read look that typifies Kia. The leather bound steering wheel on the tilt and reach column is home to cruise control, audio, and Bluetooth buttons, with the formerly slightly sharp edges in previous versions now of a softer and rounder design.Air-conditioning is effective and the dials are old school by the fact they’re…dials. In the console below is the USB, 12V, and auxiliary ports for external music supply as the Rio no longer carries a CD slot. Vale the silver disc. The dash and console itself, of a semi gloss black plastic (which reflects badly in the dash, a safety distraction) on the upper section and a gunmetal look across the horizontal, flows and blends smoothly into the door trim. Oh, it’s a key start, not push button, for the driver and their passenger as they sit in cloth and leather trimmed seats.The 4065 mm long five door sits on a handy 2580 mm wheelbase, allowing cargo space of 325 litres with the rear seats up, increasing to 980 litres folded. With an overall width of 1725 mm and height of 1450 mm there’s plenty of leg, shoulder, and head room for four adults. There’s also a USB port for the rear seat passengers, plus ISOFIX mounts, a feature virtually standard in Australian specification cars nowadays as are the six airbags, driver safety programs (bar Autonomous Emergency Braking and Blind Spot Alert).Apart from the four speed auto, it’s a delight to drive on the road. Although the alloys are just 15 inch in diameter, with 185/65 tyres the Rio rides and handles well enough for most road conditions. It’s crisp enough in turn-in with a surprising lack of understeer. It’ll lane change quick enough, given its 1162 kg plus passenger weight and will do so with minimal body roll. The torsion beam axle stabilises the rear but the rear suspension attached is a little too soft with that rear end feeling as if it would bottom out easier. The brakes also need a tightening up, with again a little too much travel before a satisfactory amount of bite happens. The usual bumps, lumps, and undulations do affect the little car but it remains mostly well tied down and does allow for a comfortable enough ride in the urban environment.At The End Of The Drive.
Bluntly, it’s a crying shame the Rio has been hamstrung with that four speed auto. The engine feels as if it wants to deliver more, the chassis is competent enough, the new look is sweet, and the trim levels across the three models provides a well appointed choice for buyers. As more and more makers with small cars with small engines move to CVTs, for all of their foibles, it’s a better option for the Rio than the current one.
For information, details on Kia’s seven year warranty and associated service plan, and to book a test drive, head over to Kia Australia here: 2017 Kia Rio range.

 

Mercedes-Benz Vans Gives The “V For Victory Sign For The V-Class.

Mercedes-Benz makes some damned good cars and they make some pretty damned good vans too.Their V-Class vans have been given some extra ammunition in their battle against makers such as Iveco, Hyundai, Ford, and Renault. The current V model, the V 250 AVANTGARDE, is now backed up by the V 220. Both will be powered by a 2.1 litre diesel, with outputs of 140 kW/440 Nm and 120 kW and 380 Nm respectively.

Yes, they “might” be vans but M-B certainly believes that drivers and passengers have the right to enjoys as well. Here’s what the V 220 will offer: Garmin MAP Pilot navigation system with 3D map display; Audio 20 sound system with touchpad, innovative controller & large CENTRAL MEDIA DISPLAY with a screen diagonal of 17.8 cm and a resolution of 800 x 480 pixels; 17 inch 5-spoke alloy wheels; Reversing camera with dynamic guide lines and Driving Assistance Package (COLLISION PREVENTION ASSIST, Blind Spot Assist and Lane Keeping Assist).

There’s plenty of very handy technology on board for the driver. There’s Agility Select, which provides four distinct driving modes which changes the mapping of the engine, throttle, and transmission. Agility Control changes the suspension and ride as a result, plus there’s Crosswind Assist, ATTENTION ASSIST, Active Parking Assist, Driver Assistance Package, Blind Spot Assist and Lane Keeping Assist, and the PRE-SAFE® accident anticipatory system.

Both vans are luxuriously appointed, with Legano leather standard in both, four way lumbar support, and the seat ventilation system has fans that can reverse flow to optimise humidity levels. A feature unique to the V Class is Thermotronic climate control, which offers pre-entry climate control from the key fob. There’s an internal demisting sensor and even a sensor to automatically switch from Fresh to Recirculate when passing through a tunnel.

The vans also have split tail gates with the rear glass able to be opened independently of the main door. This offers ease of access in tight parking spaces and the doors are also power operated.

Being luxury oriented means there’s a good dollar to be paid. The Valente BlueTec is $58,100 (MRLP) with the others priced at: V-Class V 220 BlueTec $74,990 (MRLP) and V-Class V 250 BlueTec AVANTGARDE $87,200 (MRLP).

Contact your local Mercedes-Benz dealership for state pricing.

The Best Of The Last From HSV.

Holden Special Vehicles have provided some pretty special cars in their relatively short history. The latest, and the best, of what will be the last Australian made based cars is the HSV GTSR W1.motoring.com.au recently undertook a thorough test to find out what would be Australia’s Best Driver’s Car (ABDC) with a comparison of twelve performance oriented vehicles ranging in price from $40000 to $250000. These vehicles included entries from Ford, Porsche, BMW, Fiat, and, of course, HSV. The testing was held in Tasmania over five days with close to twenty thousand kilometres of exhaustive and rigourous evaluative driving undertaken. The testing for the ABDC goes back twelve months, with a look at the cars released over the past year and making a list from those. The aim? To find out which car made the driver feel they were in the country’s top driver’s car. Andrea Matthews, a writer for motoring.com.au and a judge in the ABDC, said: ” “I love this award – it’s the one week of the year we get to ask ‘which car makes you feel most alive?'”

What was important to the testing process was the fact that all of the cars included are vehicles available from the showroom. Cars such as the Volkswagen Golf GTi ($46990) through to the Mercedes-AMG C 43 Coupe 4MATIC ($105,615) were rated as was the BMW M3 Competition ($144,900). To ensure that the judging covered as broad a range of driving environments as possible, apart from the Tasmanian roads, the cars were driven at Baskerville Raceway. The drivers themselves included Mike Sinclair, the editor in chief; Marton Pettendy, the managing editor and a contributor to Wheels magazine; Tim Britten, a long time motoring journalist, and race drivers Greg Crick (two time co-winner of Targa Tasmania) and Luke Youlden.The question is simple: what makes for a good, enjoyable, driver’s car? Driveability is obviously important, as is performance, but the most important part of that equation is how it makes the DRIVER feel. They may be quick on a racetrack but will fizz in the hands of the driver. In essence, is it something that makes you wish to drive it over and over again?

At the end of the week, and after all drivers, 12 in total, had spent time with all combatants, it was the HSV GTSR W1 that came out on top. HSV’s engineering director, Joel Stoddart, said: ““This car was built to be driven and built to be appreciated by drivers.” The car has a 474 kilowatt supercharged V8 engine, rides on Pirelli P Zero Trofeo R tyres and Australian developed Supashock suspension, and gets hauled down by race proven AP racing brakes. There’s a premium to be paid for all of this grunt and safety, with $169990 the numbers you’ll need to buy one.

Planning for the car goes back nearly three years, when Holden announced that they, along with Ford and Toyota, would cease local manufacturing. In order to ensure that HSV would sign off in the best fashion, Stoddart says: “It had to be a unique, ultimate car. I put in the presentation [to HSV management for project approval] it had to be the ultimate Australian-made drivers car.”

ABDC judge Greg Crick says of the HSV GTSR W1: “This car is so good it belies its weight and power. (It)Feels like a smaller, lighter car. Every time I drove this car I was more impressed, chassis superb in all conditions.” But that doesn’t give a full picture of what went into engineering the vehicle to be as good as it came out to be. In order to meet EURO V emissions, specially designed headers were fitted, the Tremec six speed manual transmission was fitted with a new input shaft to deal with the huge 815 Nm torque output, and the LS9 engine required a specific serpentine belt due to an unneeded power steering pump. A largerintercooler and radiator package was fitted (which dropped temperatures by as much as sixty degrees), an improved brake master cylinder was fitted and even the front track was widened to improve handling and fit under the widened guards. All of this is mated to the Australian designed, engineered, and built Zeta chassis.The final word on this must go to Marton Pettendy: “Acres of fun. Who said a big muscle car can’t be a driver’s car – and one of the best.”

The 2017 HSV GTSR W1. Winner of motoring.com.au’s Australia’s Best Driver’s Car.

(Content courtesy of Red Agency and motoring.com.au)

Car Review: 2017 Holden Astra RS.

Holden’s move to bring in its range of vehicles from Europe has already paid off with the fully European sourced Astra. With an all turbocharged engine range, the 2017 Astra family, which starts at $23990 driveaway, offers power, performance, and plenty of tech, as A Wheel Thing drives the 2017 Holden Astra 1.6L RS manual.It’s the 1.6L four here, with an immensely handy 280 torques between 1650 to 3500 revs and rolls off to the 147 kW peak output at 5500. So far it’s a numbers game, including six, six being how many forward ratios in the manual transmission supplied. It’s a delight, this transmission, with a beautifully progressive clutch pedal and a pickup point that feels natural. The gear selector is also well weighted, with no indecision in the close throw and tautly sprung lever. Reverse is across to the left and up, easily selected by a pistol grip trigger on the selecter’s front. It’s a delightfully refined package, one worth investigating, and a prime reason why we should move away from automatics as our primary transmission. Economy? A Wheel Thing finished on a sub 7.0L per 100L of 95 RON from the 48 litre tank.It’s a sweet looking machine too. A sharp yet slimline nose, with striking silver accents, rolls into a steeply raked front window, with good side vision before finishing with a somewhat odd looking C pillar design incorporating a pyramidical motif. There’s a black sheet between this and the roofline and there’s further eyeball catching with the deep scallops in the doors. Beautifully styled tail lights finish off what really is a handsome vehicle.  Inside you’ll find a well sculpted office. There’s piano black highlights that contrast with charcoal grey black plastic and cloth trim on the seats in a checkerboard pattern. The dash design itself is organic, flowing, and evokes the design ethos of higher end luxury cars. The pews front and rear are wonderfully supportive and have just the right amount of give and bolstering. Rear seat passengers get enough leg room for comfort also and there’s no problem with head room for front or rear with 1003 mm and 971 mm respectively. The driver and passenger do not get electric seats, though, however there is DAB for the high quality audio system that’s part of the GM family’s MyLink set. There’s Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility along with streaming apps. For those that like to carry kids and shopping, there’s 360L pf cargo space with the seats folded up, cupholders front and rear, USB charger point, seatback pockets, and door pockets as well.The driver and passenger do not get electric seats, though as they’re reserved for the RS-V, however there is DAB for the high quality audio system that’s part of the GM family’s MyLink set. There’s Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility along with streaming apps and the leather clad tiller has audio and cruise controls that are pure GM in their ease of use. For those that like to carry kids and shopping, there’s 360L pf cargo space with the seats folded up, cupholders front and rear, USB charger point, seatback pockets, and door pockets as well.It’s its road manners and driveability where the Astra RS really shines. The six speed manual is fluid, smooth, and completely complements the torque delivery of the 1.6L powerplant. What makes the Astra RS a delight to drive is the beautifully balanced suspension. It really is one of the best ride packages you’ll find. Period. The suppleness of the suspension is deft in its ability to change with road surface changes, whilst it firms up to provide a sporting feel when required. Rubber is from France, with lightning bolt 17 inch alloys wrapped in Michelin 225/45 tyres.From smooth freeway surfaces such as those found in western Sydney where some areas have been freshly resurfaced, to gravelled and rutted entrance roads, the Astra RS feels comfortable and poised across these and every surface in between. Thrown into off camber turns the hatch sits flat and under control and rarely does the rear end feel as if it’s not attached to the front. The steering itself is weighted just so, with a fine balance of effort versus connection to the front. There’s a bare hint of understeer being a front wheel drive car and while hint ar torque steer when the go pedal is given a hard push from standstill.Holden will give you a three year or one hundred thousand kilometre warranty, which, given the levels of warranty offered by others is starting to look a little dated. However they do offer Lifetime Capped Price Servicing plus you can take the car for a twenty four hour test drive to make up your own mind. Yes, you’ll find driver aids on board and the RS gets Automatic Emergency Braking in the suite of aids.

At The End Of The Drive.

The RS Astra, priced in the mid twenty thousand dollar range, is perhaps one of the most complete packages you can buy as a driver’s car. A torquey engine, a slick manual transmission, a comfortable office and with enough tech on board for emjoyment and safety, plus a beautifully tuned chassis add up to provide one of the most pleasureable drive experiences available. And that price makes it a competitive package in regards to value as well. Go here to check it out plus look at the new sedan: 2017 Holden Astra hatch range

ŠKODA Kodiaq Ready To Bear Arms

Czech brand Skoda is preparing to launch a raft of new vehicles including a large SUV. Based on the Audi and VW versions of the same car, the Kodiaq as it will be called, will be a compact big car and will start at a decent $42990 plus ORC. When I say it’s a compact big car, overall length will be 4697 mm, and will roll on a 2791 mm wheelbase. That’s still shorter than the Audi Q5 at 2807 mm. Height is 1676 mm, including roof rails, which makes it the same height.

At the entry level, Skoda have specified their 1.4L TSFI engine, which is an interesting choice, until you read that the dry weight is under 1500 kilos. The Skoda Octavia AWD wagon is just 1250 kg or so, so there will be a noticeable if not huge difference between the two in performance. There will be five engines on offer; two 1.4L petrol, one 2.0L petrol, and two diesels with differing power and torque at 110 kW/340 Nm and 140 kW/400 Nm.

At the Australian launch we’ll see just one variant, being the 132TSI 2.0-litre turbocharged petrol engine as standard, developing 132kW of power (as its name suggests) plus 320Nm of torque. The 140 kW diesel will arrive later in 2017. There’ll be three option packs available: Tech ($2500), Luxury ($4900), and Launch, with the first offering Adaptable Chassis Control, auto park assist, an extra off road mode plus more. Luxury gives up ventilated electrically adjustable seats at the front, leather, surround camera system and more. A limited-run Launch Pack will be available for $5900, including all features of the Tech Pack plus blind spot and lane assist, reverse camera, traffic jam and emergency assist, side mirrors with auto dim, plus rear cross traffic alert. Additionally, the Launch Pack adds Triglav alloys at 19 inch diameter.

Outside it’s a set of updated Skoda design cues, with narrower and edgier headlights reflected in a similar design at the rear, said to be inspired by traditional Czech crystal glass art. There’s an improved grille design that flows equally as well with the headlights and the whole body is based on the family group’s modular transverse matrix which builds in hot stamped metal sheeting for a high rigidity factor with improved safety implications.

Check out http://www.skoda.com.au and register your interest there.

Car Review: 2017 Holden Trax LS

Holden has a history of importing small cars for SUV style duties. Suzuki gave us the Drover, Isuzu the Jackeroo and a jacked up Barina became the Trax. A refresh to the car has been performed, with noticeable changes inside and out. The 2017 Holden Trax LS spends a week in the urban jungle.Up front is the 1.4L turbo four that once resided in the Cruze. In that car, even with an auto, it was lively, peppy, zippy. Not so in the LS auto. Holden have released the LS with the 1.8L engine and manual or the turbo four and auto only. Even with 200 torques at 1850 rpm it’s pulling close to 1400 kilos and felt as if the gear ratios were holding the little SUV back. When punched hard and under way, the performance characteristics did change…having said that, the auto had an unusual and odd whine, one not out of place in a manual transmission that wasn’t calibrated correctly.The turbo four drinks 95 RON as its preferred tipple and will do so at 6.9L per 100 km (quoted,combined) from a tank weighing in at 53 litres. That’s pretty much on the money in the week A Wheel Thing had the petite LS Trax however that’s the combined figure. Given this kind of car will be in short distance, stop start, style of travel, figure on something closer to 8.0L/100 km.

Ride quality is a mixed bag in the front wheel drive only Trax LS with a even and smooth feeling on freshly laid roads morphing into unsure and tentative on broken and rutted surfaces. There was even occasional mild bump steer and an odd sensation of the front MacPherson strut suspension’s settings not balancing the compound crank axle rear. Driving over the mildly broken surfaces of some local roads would have the front gently absorbing the irregularities and the rear would feel less tied down. All in all, just not a balanced mix. Handling was also a mixed bag with a numbness either side of centre of the tiller, a feeling of twitchiness in the communication from the steering wheel, and just hints of understeer from the Continental 205/70/16 rubber when pushed.

The brakes were the same odd mix, with nothing but pedal pressure for what felt like an inch before a gentle bite, a too gentle bite at that. In order to get any sense of stopping power a harder shove was required and there was no sense of progression, rather a change from soft to grab hard, a most disconcerting sensation in high traffic. That’s perhaps due to the drum rears, not discs. It’s also apparently fitted with HSA, or Hill Start Assist, however even gentle slopes such as those found in undergroup car parks had the car rolling back once the foot was off the brake.

The transmission in the LS Turbo is, as mentioned, a six speed auto. It is fitted with a manual override, accessible via a simple toggle switch on the selector. This was invaluable in the climb up Sydney’s Old Bathurst Road, just west of Penrith, at the base of the Blue Mountains. In traffic, rather than the indecisive self selector, by using the manual it would more than happily crawl/walk/run uphill depending on the traffic gaps. It was quicker in changing gears doing this and came in handly also in overtaking.Brownie points, also, for the interior of the Trax. It’s an office come boys club in that it’s a comfortable place to be yet efficient in design and layout. It’s a traditional key in the right hand side of the column, standard GM switchgear, all blended into a smooth, flowing, organically styled dash with the pews comfy and providing plenty of lateral support. There’s the MyLink system on board and housed in a seven inch touchscreen which includes phone projection which is Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, but the LS misses out on DAB as the entry level model in the three model range. There’s an LCD screen in the dash binnacle which also houses analogue dials, appropriate for an entry level vehicle.There’s also Bluetooth streaming, USB and Auxiliary inputs but the death of the car-based CD player was also on show, with no slot to slip the silver disc in. A point off, though, for the design of the tiller, as the centrepoint is above the horizontal centreline which makes for an uncomfortable 11 and 1 hand position. Storage wise you’re looked after with a tray under the passenger seat, door pockets, good sized cup holders and sunglasses holder.There’s good rear legroom at 908 mm, headroom at 985 mm, and shoulder room is good for two adults at 1340 mm. This is inside a petite 4257 mm overall length yet packing a 2555 mm wheelbase. This means the corners are pushed out into the pumped out guards and sees the otherwise somewhat dumpy looking five door seem a touch larger than what the dimensions suggest. The height has a bit to do with it, being an inch shy of 1700 mm.Otherwise, you’re looking at a redeveloped nose, bringing the Trax into line looks wise with the Colorado and Captiva, with the flattened six sided lower air intake under the single bar upper. There’s LED driving lights but no halogens in the lower quarters. The rear is less made over, with the family resemblance to big sibling Captiva perhaps more slightly enhanced and hides a 356/785 litre cargo capacity accessed by an easy to open and lift tailgate. Naturally there’s a camera for reversing and it provides a crisp and clear picture on the screen.There’s six airbags, the now mandatory safety aids under the skin, pretensioning seatbelts, collapsible pedals, plus Holden’s standard three year or one hundred thousand kilometre warranty. Reverse sensors partner with the aforementioned camera to complete the package. At the time of writing, the first four services will cost you $229 each at intervals of one-year or 15,000km, a fair ask for peace of mind and for budget conscious buyers.

At The End Of The Drive.
The LS Trax with turbo four and six speed auto was, at best, competent in this particular vehicle. Performance was somewhat lacklustre until pushed and that transmission whine was a worry. It does though look smooth and organic inside and offers enough usable room for four adults. At around $25K driveaway it’s not a budget breaker either however. For details and to book a test drive to make up your own mind, go here:2017 Holden Trax range